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Information last updated 17 November 2022
Acknowledgement
The Women's and Children's Hospital is located on the traditional lands for the Kaurna people, and we respect their spiritual relationship with their Country. We also acknowledge that the Kaurna people are the custodians of the Adelaide region, and that their cultural and heritage beliefs are still as important to the living Kaurna people today.

Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people should be aware that this website may contain images, voices and names of people who have passed away.

Stage Two of the Neonatal Nursery Redevelopment is now complete, with our new Neonatal Intensive Care Unit ready to welcome its first patients.

Stage 2 complete

Our Neonatal Intensive Care Unit (NICU) Redevelopment is now complete, with the new space ready to welcome some of our most vulnerable patients and their families.

Our clinicians, staff and consumers worked closely with the design team to create a spacious, calming and supportive NICU where we can continue to deliver high quality care and services to some of our tiniest patients.

The new space features single-patient rooms, giving families and carers more cot-side space, comfort and privacy while spending quality time with their baby during what is often a difficult and stressful time.

It also includes a room that accommodates two isolettes for twins, and an additional negative pressure room.

Each patient room is equipped with ceiling-mounted medical pendants, allowing staff to change the position of the isolette and pendant as needed.

Our new NICU also includes a multi-purpose room and ensuite for families experiencing palliative care, allowing parents or carers to stay overnight with their baby.

The features of our new unit are the direct result of consultation with staff and consumers, and underline our commitment to person and family-centred care.

Take a look at our new NICU in the video below!

Stage 1 complete

Stage One of our Neonatal Nursery redevelopment is now complete. The new SCBU has a number of features that are the direct result of consultation with our staff and consumers and underline our commitment to Person and Family Centred care.
This includes a new family lounge area and additional space at the cot side for families and carers to spend quality time with their baby in comfort, as well as isolation rooms for individual and twin babies.

Additional features include an information panel at the nursery entrance where families can see which staff members are assigned to care for their infant, a dedicated wash-up station for cleaning breast feeding equipment, a staff call system in each cot space and the introduction of programmed circadian lighting to promote neuro-developmental care.

The larger space will improve patient privacy and infection control while making families feel more comfortable during what is often a difficult and stressful time.

Our clinicians, staff and consumers worked closely with the design team to create a spacious, calming and supportive environment where we can continue to deliver high quality care and services to some of our most vulnerable patients. Our new SCBU is a wonderful example of what we can do in our new hospital.

The upgrade to part of the Special Care Baby Unit is part of the $50 million sustainment of our current site, which will ensure we have modern facilities as we plan our new hospital to be co-located with the Royal Adelaide Hospital.

Some Frequently Asked Questions about the Special Care Baby Unit and the SCBU 2 Redevelopment have been developed to help families spending time in this area.

Take a look at our new Special Care Baby Unit in the video below!

Amy's story

Over the past 5 years, the Women's and Children's Hospital has become almost a second home for Amy Purling and her two young sons, James, 5, and Jack, 22 months.

Both boys were born prematurely and spent time in both the Neonatal Intensive Care Unit (NICU) and Special Care Baby Unit (SCBU).

James was born at 30 weeks and spent 5 weeks in hospital before coming home with the support of the Neonatal discharge program, which provides additional specialist support in the home.

Jack was born at 34 weeks and spent a week in the care of the nurses and midwives of the Neonatal Nurseries.

James is now a healthy 5 year old and has just started school, while Jack has required ongoing care at the WCH for a range of health concerns.

“The care we’ve received every single time has been outstanding, from the doctors, the nurses, all the staff, we can't fault them and we're forever grateful,” Amy said.

Jack's care has included several inpatient stays to help with his feeding and respiratory issues and Amy estimates the family has spent several months at the hospital on and off for the past two years.

Amy says the emotional support she has received from the staff, in particular, has been just as important as the brilliant care Jack has received.

“They take care of me as much as they look after Jack,” she said.

The Neonatal nurseries, where both James and Jack began their journey, are being upgraded as part of a $50 million investment in making sure the current WCH has modern facilities while planning is underway for a new WCH.

The new Special Care Baby Unit opened in 2020, and the Neonatal Intensive Care Unit will be open later in 2021.

Amy says the new spaces will make a huge difference for families going through tough times.

“The new SCBU is so bright and spacious and will help families feel calm in the uncertainty that can come from having a child in the nursery,” Amy said. “I'm looking forward to seeing the rest of the upgrades.”