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COVID-19
Information for the community – Updated guidelines from 27 July 2021
Acknowledgement
The Women's and Children's Hospital is located on the traditional lands for the Kaurna people, and we respect their spiritual relationship with their Country. We also acknowledge that the Kaurna people are the custodians of the Adelaide region, and that their cultural and heritage beliefs are still as important to the living Kaurna people today.

Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people should be aware that this website may contain images, voices and names of people who have passed away.

Nutrition for Specific Medical Conditions

Nutrition resources for specific medical conditions in children and adolescents.

Allergy

For single allergy fact sheets and more information on food allergy see:

Booklets

Recipe books

Fact sheets

  • Calcium information
    Calcium is required for the normal development and maintenance of the skeleton as well as for the proper functioning of neuromuscular and cardiac function. It is stored in the teeth and bones where it provides structure and strength. Calcium is found predominantly in cow's milk and dairy based foods. If avoiding cow's milk it is important to include appropriate calcium containing substitutes and/or a calcium supplement.
  • Low benzoate diet
    Benzoates are a group of preservatives used by food manufacturers. They act to prolong the shelf life of foods by slowing the growth of bacteria and yeast.
  • Low sulphite diet
    Sulphites are some of the oldest and most commonly used preservatives in our food supply. Sulphites act to prolong the shelf life of foods by slowing browning reactions. They may also be used as bleaching agents or preservatives in some foods, drinks and medicines.
  • Low amine diet
    Dietary amines come from protein breakdown in foods. Levels increase in protein foods (meat, fish, cheese) as they age or mature, and in fruits as they ripen (e.g. bananas, tomatoes).
  • Low food colouring diet
    Colouring agents are used to make food more colourful or to compensate for colour lost in processing. Food colourings may be made from natural chemicals, or may be made from artificial chemicals that are not normally found in the food that we eat.
  • Low MSG diet
    Monosodium glutamate (MSG) is a flavour enhancer added to some commercial foods. Glutamine is also found naturally in some foods.
  • Food additives
    Food additives are used to enhance the flavour, appearance, freshness or shelf-life of foods.
Gastroenterology

Fact sheets

  • Low lactose diet for children
    Lactose is the natural sugar found in milk and milk products. Lactose intolerance occurs when the body cannot digest and absorb lactose well. Common symptoms include bloating, diarrhoea, wind and pain after eating foods high in lactose. Lactose intolerance may be temporary (for example after gastroenteritis) or may be a longer lasting problem.
  • Low fructose diet for children
    Fructose (sometimes called fruit sugar) is a natural sugar that is mainly found in fruit, honey and processed foods.
  • Low sucrose diet for children
    Sucrose is the sugar from sugar cane – also known as table sugar. The main sources are sugar we add ourselves (e.g. sprinkled on cereal or added in cooking), sugar added to processed foods, and sugar found naturally in some fruits and vegetables.
  • Low fibre diet
    Lowering the amount of fibre that travels through the bowel can be helpful when the bowel is irritated, inflamed or narrowed. It is also used before and after some types of surgery.
Cancer

Fact sheets

Cystic Fibrosis

These education resources are specifically targeted for children with Cystic Fibrosis (CF) and their families. Children with CF often need to follow a high energy diet and require salt supplementation. They may also need to be on pancreatic enzyme replacement therapy (PERT) to help them digest and absorb food. Children with CF should see a dietitian who specialises in the area regularly to monitor their growth and give individualised dietary advice.

Booklets

  • Understanding tube feeding for patients with Cystic Fibrosis
    In some cases, children with Cystic Fibrosis (CF) find it difficult to gain weight or grow normally even if they take their enzymes and follow a high calorie diet. This is generally because they have increased work of breathing, difficulty absorbing food and use extra energy to fight chest infections.

Fact sheets

Diabetes

Fact sheets

  • Glycemic Index (GI) and Diabetes
    This resource is targeted at people with diabetes. It explains the concept of glycemic index, why it is important, what factors have an effect on the GI of a food, what the numbers mean and how to use GI in eating plans. It contains a clearly set out table outlining the low, moderate and high GI options within groups of foods to help people make lower GI choices. There is also some information on the GI symbol.
  • Counting carbohydrates
    This resource is specifically targeted at children with type-1 diabetes and their families. The information focuses on counting carbohydrate in grams and covers the average carbohydrate content of common foods, resources families can use to assist with carbohydrate counting, label reading, and recipe modification. It is designed to be given alongside other information on healthy eating for diabetes.
  • Counting carbohydrates – pictorial
    This education resource is specifically targeted at children with type-1 diabetes and their families. The format is picture based to assist with teaching children or families with low literacy skills. The resource includes the average carbohydrate content of common foods and a meal plan template.
  • Eat well and be active for Type-1 Diabetes
    To be healthy and achieve a healthy weight it is important to adjust your insulin to the food you eat, choose the right balance of healthy foods, and be physically active.
  • Snack choices for Type-1 Diabetes
    Healthy eating is important for every child. Unfortunately snack times are often when children eat poor quality, highly processed foods with added fat and sugar. Examples include chips, muesli bars, biscuits, chocolate, or fruit juice. These foods don’t always fill children up and can often lead to overeating, which can lead to high blood glucose levels and weight gain.
Enteral Feeding

Fact sheet

Iron Deficiency

Fact sheet

Phenylketonuria (PKU)

Booklets

  • Low protein diet for Phenylketonuria (PKU)
    The Low Protein Diet for Phenlketonuria (PKU) is only for children and adults with PKU. A low protein diet is part of the management of PKU – children and adults with PKU should discuss this with a specialist dietitian who is a member of a metabolic team based at a major hospital in Australia.
  • First foods for Phenylketonuria (PKU)
    A low protein diet is part of the management of PKU. Starting your baby on solid foods is an important milestone in their life. This booklet provides you with practical information on introducing your baby to solid foods and progressing towards family meals.
Ketogenic/modified Atkins diet

Fact sheets

  • Ketogenic diet
    The ketogenic diet is a medically and dietetically supervised diet that may be used as a treatment option in the management of epilepsy and some neurometabolic disorders. It is a high fat, low carbohydrate and moderate protein diet that makes the body burn fat instead of carbohydrate for energy. Burning fat for energy produces "ketones", and for some children having a very high level of ketones in their blood helps to reduce seizure activity or moderate their neurometabolic disease.
  • Modified Atkins diet
    This fact sheet provides families with information on frequently asked questions about the Modified Atkins Diet (MAD) for children with epilepsy and treatment for some metabolic conditions. The diet should not be started without medical and dietetic supervision.
Underweight and Faltering Growth

Fact sheets

  • Tips for gaining weight
    There are lots of reasons why you might lose weight unnecessarily. This fact sheet provides you with information and ideas on how to follow a high energy and high protein diet to help with weight gain.
  • Tips for gaining weight for infants and toddlers
    Children can be underweight for many reasons. Extra nutrition and extra energy (kilojoules/ calories) are important to help gain weight. This fact sheet provides advice on following a high energy and high protein diet to help with weight gain.
Feeding difficulties

Fact sheets

  • High energy – Mince moist
    A mince moist diet may be recommended for a variety of reasons including; difficulty chewing food, dysphagia (difficulty swallowing), post trauma or surgical procedures to the mouth, throat or gastrointestinal tract. This texture includes foods which are soft and moist.
  • High energy – Smooth pureed foods
    A smooth puree diet may be recommended for a variety of reasons including; difficulty chewing food, dysphagia (difficulty swallowing), post trauma or surgical procedures to the mouth, throat or gastrointestinal tract.
  • High energy – Soft foods
    A soft diet may be recommended for a variety of reasons including; difficulty chewing food, dysphagia (difficulty swallowing), post trauma or surgical procedures to the mouth, throat or gastrointestinal tract.