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COVID-19
Information for the community – Updated guidelines from 5 August 2021
Acknowledgement
The Women's and Children's Hospital is located on the traditional lands for the Kaurna people, and we respect their spiritual relationship with their Country. We also acknowledge that the Kaurna people are the custodians of the Adelaide region, and that their cultural and heritage beliefs are still as important to the living Kaurna people today.

Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people should be aware that this website may contain images, voices and names of people who have passed away.

After the Birth of Your Baby

We encourage you to cuddle your baby immediately and to breastfeed as soon as you can. In most cases your baby can be bathed and weighed in the delivery room. If you are both well you well be transferred to the Postnatal ward for continuing care.

We encourage you to cuddle your baby immediately and to breastfeed as soon as you can.

As soon as possible after your baby is born, two identification bands with your surname are applied to your baby's limbs.

In most cases your baby can be bathed and weighed in the delivery room. If you are both well you well be transferred to the Postnatal Unit for continuing care.

Your baby will remain by your bedside (room in). This allows you and your family to get to know and enjoy your new baby. Midwives will support you with the practical aspects of caring for your baby.

Your baby will be carefully examined by the doctor or midwife soon after birth and again before you go home. At least one of these examinations will be by a doctor from the hospital's Special Care Baby Unit. Staff neonatologists (doctors who specialise in newborn babies) are always available to examine babies in need of extra care. Some babies need to be transferred to the Special Care Baby Unit or Neonatal Intensive Care Unit for ongoing treatment or monitoring.

About the third day after birth a heel prick blood test, known as the Neonatal Screening Test, is undertaken to check for some rare but significant conditions.

Visitors

Friends and family members will be eager to visit but your needs must come first. As night feeding means interrupted sleep, it is important for you to rest during the day. We suggest that you limit the number of visitors in hospital and during the first few days at home.

It is important that people who have infectious illnesses such as chicken pox, a cold sore, flu, parvovirus, stomach upset or bad cough or cold do not visit you. These infections are easily spread and some are dangerous for pregnant women and newborn babies.

Visiting hours are between 1pm and 8pm daily. Partners are able to visit outside these times between 8.30am and 9.30pm.

Breastfeeding

Breastfeeding is best for you and your baby because breast milk provides your baby protection against infection and allergies and helps you to recover more quickly from childbirth. Your midwife will help and support you with any questions and concerns about breastfeeding.

For more information about breastfeeding support please visit:

Physiotherapy

While you are in hospital a physiotherapist will visit and advise you about postnatal exercise and back care. For more detail, go to the following page:

Immunisation

Your baby may be given a Hepatitis B vaccination while you are in hospital. The WCH has an Immunisation Clinic. If you do not have immunity to Rubella you will be offered immunisation after your baby is born.

Documentation

A number of forms must be completed and forwarded to the relevant agency. Before going home you will be given:

  • a birth registration form
  • a maternity allowance and maternity immunisation allowance claim form
  • a Medicare enrolment form
  • a WCH notification of newborn's surname form.

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