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COVID-19
Information for the community – Updated guidelines from 5 August 2021
Acknowledgement
The Women's and Children's Hospital is located on the traditional lands for the Kaurna people, and we respect their spiritual relationship with their Country. We also acknowledge that the Kaurna people are the custodians of the Adelaide region, and that their cultural and heritage beliefs are still as important to the living Kaurna people today.

Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people should be aware that this website may contain images, voices and names of people who have passed away.

Our midwives and doctors will do their best to fulfil your wishes and follow your birthing plan. They will answer any questions and discuss all reasonable and safe requests.

Our midwives and doctors will do their best to fulfil your wishes and follow your birthing plan. They will answer any questions and discuss all reasonable and safe requests.

Support during labour

Your partner and/or support person are encouraged to stay with you during your labour and the birth of your baby. This is a very personal and special time for you and your partner and your comfort may be affected if you have too many visitors. Please choose your support people carefully and be sure they will assist rather than distract you.

Pain and pain relief in labour

The perception of pain during childbirth varies for different women and between births for the same woman. Some women prefer to go through labour without using medication for pain relief. You are encouraged to discuss your pain relief preferences your midwife or doctor.

Non-drug methods

Your support person can play a very important role in helping you deal with pain. Physical methods of pain relief can be very beneficial and may be all that you require. These include:

  • walking
  • relaxation
  • massage
  • breathing awareness
  • position changes
  • warm water

These methods will be discussed during antenatal classes.

Drug methods

There are several methods of administering pain-relieving drugs. These include:

  • Breathing a blend of nitrous oxide and oxygen (gas). This may also be used in combination with other pain relief methods.
  • Pain-relieving drugs such as pethidine and fentanyl may be given by injection or through an intravenous drip
  • Drugs that provide a local anaesthetic may be used to block the nerves that transmit pain. The most common way of providing this pain relief is with an epidural anaesthetic, given through a fine tube in the lower part of the back.
  • The most common form of anaesthetic for a caesarean section is a spinal block, similar to an epidural.

We encourage you to cuddle your baby immediately following the birth and to breastfeed as soon as you can.

For more extensive information on options for pain relief during labour, including resources for non-English speaking women, please go to: